Ode

August 20th 2016

Today I sat at a piano and Alice taught me a tune. I can’t remember the name of the tune, or how it went. But it’s a piano duet, with an upper and lower scale. It turns out I’m a bit shit at the piano so Alice recruited someone who actually knew what he was doing. 

My entire memory of everything I learnt at secondary school is summed up by a single phrase. Ode to Joy. I remember basically nothing else from 16 years of education other than the first two lines of Ode To Joy on keyboard. 

EEFG GFED CCDE EDD

EEFG GFED CCDE DCC

And every time I have the opportunity to practice this one single skill I picked up from school, I try my best to nail it. Alice knows this story, my Ode to Ode to Joy, and so she tried to teach me how to play something else. But it didn’t really work. 

I just couldn’t remember the pattern, and neither of us knew the names of the notes/keys. But as hard as I try I’ll never forget the notes to Ode To Joy. It’s one of the very many weird ways that my brain is hard wired. I’ll remember weird and useless information from years ago, but not anything important or relevant from recently. 

EEFG GFED CCDE EDD

EEFG GFED CCDE DCC

I always found it ironic that my Music teacher at school was named Joy Barnes. And the only thing she ever taught me was Ode To Joy. And every time I play it it’s my Ode To Joy Barnes. 

I sometimes find myself absentmindedly tapping the keys out with my fingers against a table or my leg. It annoys Alice, and she’ll say “Ode to joy? Stop it” which is fair enough. 

I apologise if I’ve told this story before, because I feel like I have, but I guess that just proves my point about the broken way my brain works. It holds nothing but useful facts and piano scales. I don’t even know if ‘scales’ is the right word but I read the term ‘piano scales’ in a book once so I’m going for it. 

I should also mention that the piano was at a party that was thrown to celebrate the engagement of Alice’s sister, Hannah and her fiancé Sean. (I have no idea how to spell fiancé because I’m fairly sure it’s sometimes spent with two e’s depending on to which person you are referring) 

As we were leaving the party a pianist with far more skills than me played the wedding march. It was a lovely evening. 

Until tomorrow, congratulations, both of you. 

Jacn

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